Why You Should Move When You’re an Empty Nester

People often talk fondly about their retirement and kid-free years when they’ll travel the world, move to a bustling city and maybe buy a boat or motorcycle.  Unfortunately, time slips away, and you start missing the days of knee-deep diapers and travel soccer tournaments, forgetting plans to paint the town red during retirement.  Don’t allow sentiment or fear to disrupt your dreams – let us show you why you should move when you’re an empty nester.

More Affordable

If you downsize your home, you’ll save on heating and cooling costs as well as lower mortgage payments and other household expenses.  Money saved from the sale of your home could go to expenses, savings, travel and projects you’d like to accomplish, says CNBC.  Remember, too, that money can be saved for the future when medical costs increase.  Once you retire, you may not have the income to support living in a more expensive home, so moving may be the answer.  While searching for a smaller place, Brick Underground suggests renting until you know exactly what you want and can afford and you establish a new budget.

More Me-Time

When you don’t need to worry about school schedules and staying close to your kids’ friends, you can move where you want.  Your life is your own and what you make of it is up to you.  Think hard about what you want and create that ideal reality.  There are hobbies, vacations to foreign destinations and no time restrictions to embrace.  Take a deep breath and jump into a brand new life!

Less Home Maintenance

Unless you enjoy home improvement projects including landscaping, do you really want to spend your Golden Years performing constant maintenance? Although you’ve become accustomed to living in spacious conditions, you simply need to declutter and envision yourself in a smaller environment, says Washington Post, and decide which rooms now seem extraneous.  Many retirement communities provide storage units or use FlatRate Moving’s versatile storage facilities.

Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

Now that you’re an empty nester, you can come and go as you please, generate or forego schedules, depending on your taste.  This also means you don’t have to stay in the suburbs –shift to a city atmosphere or slow down and hang ten.  Washington Post points out, though, that a nice retirement community with all the amenities or a plush city or beach spread may ultimately cost more than the large homestead you’re selling.

Reconsider Your Homestead

As you age, the arrangement of your home becomes more of a concern, especially if you have physical disabilities or trouble trudging up the stairs.  Shoveling a long driveway could put undue pressure on you to take care of it or find someone else to shovel it.  Having one floor of living space, a bathroom featuring shower safety measures, and a maintenance crew to tend to your home and the surrounding grounds sounds appealing.

Worry-Free Kids

Kids switch roles with their parents when they’re older and start worrying about their parents’ well-being.  You may already be the recipient of well-intentioned advice and weekly check-up calls and visits from them.  Decide if you’d like to live closer to your children and let them be part of the relocation process wherever you end up moving.  Once you’re established in your new residence, they may ease up on the nagging and admire their independent parents.